Logo of Uncharted literary magazine
"A premier publisher of short fiction and the newest platform from the team behind The Masters Review, CRAFT Literary, Fractured Lit, and The Voyage Journal"
Open:
Yes
Vibe: Top-tier stuff. Not Paris Review, but ok
Response time:
3 months / 55 days
Payment:
$200
Simultaneous submissions:
Yes
Previously published:
Yes
Submission fee:
Free
Expedited submissions:
No
Available in print:
No
Examples online:
Yes
Average acceptance rate:
0%
Country:
United States
Year founded:
2021
Has Masthead info:
Yes

Chill Subs Tracker Stats!

Total tracked subs
22
Average acceptance rate
0% (so far)
Average response time
55 days
Average acceptance time
-
Average rejection time
55 days
Fastest response time
9 days
Slowest response time
169 days

Important stuff

Active on social media
Available in print
Pays! $200 for original stories
Accept previously published (but reprints aren't paid)

Genres

đź‘Ś

Fiction

Max words: 5000

Masthead

We currently list only main editors, more will be added later!
If you're an editor, you can edit your masthead in our admin panel :)

Tommy Dean

Editor-in-Chief

Josh Roark

Editor-in-Chief

Elizabeth Crowder

Associate Editor

Examples

'Icicle People or The Lake Effect Snow Queen' by JASMINE SAWERS

(excerpt)
I dig myself out of my house to start my patrol. When I emerge, the path I’ve made is already filling back in with fat, wet snow, blowing in all directions. It is ever trying to buffet me about, to billow me to the edge of town, to strike me snow-blind and wind-deaf so I lose my way, but I got my snow legs a long time long ago. The flakes come quick and steady in clumps that smell of sugar glass about to break. Once, I might have made a snowball, a snowman, a snow fort. Once, it might have seemed beautiful. Today, I trudge through it until I find my first extraction.
Read the full piece in the magazine

'Hold Your Breath' by K.C. MEAD-BREWER

(excerpt)
Toe-curling things happen down at The Lake House. Sex, of course, and howling and injuries and a couple of disappearances, drownings, and once a kid hanged himself from the loft banister and another time a handful of teenagers tore out of there claiming that the walls had started bleeding, and no, they weren’t high, why would you even ask that. People say things live in the lake. But of course, things live in the lake. Fish, April thinks, ducks, algae, frogs. Lakes always have things living in them. Not like this, people say. Not like our mermaid. The mermaid who doesn’t need air or water to breathe. No, she breathes souls, they say. She breathes death.
Read the full piece in the magazine

'Starving' by ASHLEY BAO

(excerpt)
We were lost in the woods. He held the map sideways, trying to decipher which path we were on. Charles Bailey Loop or the connector? The David English Trail or the Wessel Castles? Which old dead white man who donated to the park service fifty years ago could lead us back to the parking lot? Mushrooms popped out of the ground, some light brown, others neon orange. He liked to squat down, snap a photo of the white stems and underside gills. He said he was a naturalist in the vein of Charles Darwin. Great American beech trees towered over us, bare bark carved with hearts and initials of people who have walked the same trails as us and who, hopefully, had found a way out as well. If he were in a better mood, he probably would have taken out his knife and added our names to the list. The more cuts, the more damage to the tree, but he was a naturalist and what did I know?
Read the full piece in the magazine

'Genre Insights: Tara Campbell' by TARA CAMPBELL

(excerpt)
What are your writerly obsessions? What theme, idea, or image do you often gravitate towards? As a mixed-race writer (Black and white), I feel myself coming back to the idea of in-betweenness again and again. In fact, I think I gravitate toward the speculative because it allows me to grapple with human issues of love, fear, prejudice, violence, power, etc without having to limit myself to one specific real-world identity. I am neither-nor—or both-and—so writing from non-human perspectives based in irreal settings lets me get past all of the categorization that can be so confusing to those of us in liminal spaces.
Read the full piece in the magazine

Contributors on Chill Subs (0)

No one has added their publication in this magazine yet :) Be the first!

All contributors (last updated: forever ago)

Contributors are coming :)

(or not, maybe it's too many of them)